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  1912a 1912b 1913 1914a
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1912

The Gray Tree, 1911

Piet Mondrian visits Paris in the middle of June, perhaps saw the Independants. He worked near Domburg, Amsterdam, Zeeland, on Still Life with Gingerpot I, and later that year, December 20, moved to Paris.
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1912

Still Life with Gingerpot 2, 1912

1912-1914 the Cubist phase. Mondrian moved to Paris, where he  begun spelling his name with only one “a”. May 11 Piet Mondrian moved to 33 Avenue du Maine, then to 26 Rue du Depart next to Gare Montparnasse. Figuration was progressively dissolved, “compositions” in ocres, browns, and greys were based on trees (1912-13), partly walls, and church facades (1913-1914).
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1913

Tableau No.1, 1913

1912-1914 the Cubist phase. Mondrian moved to Paris, where he  begun spelling his name with only one “a”. May 11,  Piet Mondrian moved to 33 Avenue du Maine, then to 26 Rue du Depart next to Gare Montparnasse. Figuration was progressively dissolved, “compositions” in ocres, browns, and greys were based on trees (1912-13), partly walls, and church facades (1913-1914).
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1914

Composition in Oval with Color Planes 2, 1914

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Throughout his lifetime Piet Mondrian moved back and fourth from Holland to Paris onto to London and finally New York, moving either because of his need to place himself within a certain social complexity that would evidently also change painting style, or moving because of the threat of foreshadowing war thru both WWI and WWII. Along his way he acquired a language of many styles, evolving his own work with an incredible lineality. Learning to paint in a style of lassic Dutch realism, he painted portraits, still life’s, and naturalist landscapes. He learned new styles with incredible speed and understanding, often painting better than his colleagues and even masters. His work quickly moved thru luminist, and divisionist phases to abstract expressionist, pointillist, and cubist,finally ending with his well-known primary colored neoplastic phase, or new image phase.Mondrian was also a very eloquent writer, and visionary, writing several articles on his theories of the combining of all the arts. He wrote of a new world where all the arts including: painting, sculpture, architecture, music, theater would combine as one entity called the new image, the neo-plastic (neoplasticism). He was partly responsible for creating De Stijl (the style) magazine, a collective of mainly artists and architects who wanted modernism to become a well-known international idea and practice. Mondrian’s work would help from design schools such as the Bauhaus, and end up having a tremendous effect on the arts from graphic design to fashion and architecture.

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